Six Skills Your Personal Injury Attorney Should Possess

November 15, 2012, by Clifford K. Wells, Esq.

129359_conference_room_1.jpgJust as any career would dictate the type of skills a person would need to succeed in the field, a personal injury lawyer must have a unique set of traits to be good at his job. Among those skills best suited for the job are the following.

Public Speaking

Anyone who has ever sat in on a courtroom hearing or has watched a courtroom drama knows that a lawyer must be able to speak in a way that is both easily understood and inspiring to those listening. This skill is essential for success in convincing a judge and jury that his client is trustworthy and truthful.

Clear and Concise Communication

While there are points in time when the lawyer must speak up in representation of the client, much of the communication with the court and with the opposition is done in writing. For this reason, clear and concise written communication is almost more important that verbal prowess.

Dedication to a Cause

In order to speak within meaning about a topic, a person must have a level of passion for it. A personal injury lawyer must truly believe that the victims in the cases deserve justice and that they should receive compensation for the wrongs they suffered at the hands of another.

Logical Mindset

With every legal case, there is a lot of thinking to be done. A legal professional must be able to sift through large volumes of information and take away only what is most important and impactful on the case in question. This will call for a great deal of analysis and the ability to draw logical conclusions.

Organizational and Time Management Techniques

With the vast amount of information and paperwork that pass hands during a trial, an unorganized person would never survive in the field of law. Personal injury attorneys must be able to make sense of what passes over their desks and be able to store it in an easy-to-access manner to ensure that they are always prepared for the unexpected.

Technological Know-How

Part of the organizational and researching processes is the ability to use a computer with confidence. Internet searches, word processing, file location, e-mailing, and accounting are just a few of the things that are done on computers in the average law office. That will leave the technological inept person in the dust.